Bill Text: SC H3002 | 2021-2022 | 124th General Assembly | Introduced


Bill Title: Instruction, American founding principles

Spectrum: Partisan Bill (Republican 49-1)

Status: (Introduced) 2021-03-04 - Member(s) request name added as sponsor: Herbkersman [H3002 Detail]

Download: South_Carolina-2021-H3002-Introduced.html


A BILL

TO AMEND SECTION 59-29-120, CODE OF LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA, 1976, RELATING TO AMERICAN FOUNDING PRINCIPLES INSTRUCTION REQUIRED IN PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS AND PUBLICLY SUPPORTED COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES, SO AS TO PROVIDE SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS CONCERNING INSTRUCTION IN UNITED STATES FOUNDATIONAL HISTORY IN PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOLS; TO AMEND SECTION 59-120-130, RELATING TO THE DURATION OF REQUIRED AMERICAN FOUNDING PRINCIPLES INSTRUCTION, SO AS TO LIMIT ITS APPLICATION WITH RESPECT TO PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING; TO AMEND SECTION 59-29-140, RELATING TO THE REQUIREMENT THAT THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION PRESCRIBE CERTAIN TEXTS FOR USE IN REQUIRED AMERICAN FOUNDING PRINCIPLES INSTRUCTION, SO AS TO SPECIFY CERTAIN TEXTS THAT MUST BE INCLUDED; AND TO AMEND SECTION 59-29-155, RELATING TO RELATED REQUIREMENTS OF THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION AND THE EDUCATION OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE, SO AS TO MAKE CONFORMING CHANGES.

Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of South Carolina:

SECTION    1.    Section 59-29-120 of the 1976 Code is amended by adding a subsection at the end to read:

    "(D)    A school district, starting in the sixth grade and continuing through the twelfth grade, annually shall provide instruction in United States foundational history, as defined in this subsection, for a minimum of thirty hours of classroom instruction. This annual instruction in United States foundational history must be divided into four sections with each section consisting of no less than five hours of classroom instruction time, allocated as follows:

        (1)    The first section shall examine both the events leading up to the War for Independence and its causes and include, but not be limited to, the French and Indian War; the life of young George Washington, including the Native American legend of his divine protection; American resistance to increased British regulation and taxation; debates between colonists and the British government about the authority of Parliament to make laws for and impose taxes on the colonists; the military occupation of Boston and the Boston Massacre, including Crispus Attucks, the Boston Tea Party, the Intolerable Acts, the preparation of the colonists for armed conflict; Patrick Henry's 'Liberty or Death' speech; and the Continental Congress;

        (2)    The second section shall examine the War for Independence including, but not limited to, the Battles of Lexington and Concord; the Siege of Boston and the Battle of Bunker Hill; the defense of Fort Sullivan, including the importance of Carolina Day; the loss of New York City; the victories at Trenton and Princeton; the victory at Saratoga; the training and reorganization of the army at Valley Forge; the French alliance; the Battle of Monmouth; successful American resistance to British efforts to crush the Revolution in the South, including the sieges of Savannah and Charleston, Camden, King's Mountain, the campaign of Francis Marion, African American soldiers, the Yorktown campaign, the disbanding of the Continental Army, the Treaty of Peace, and Washington's resignation;

        (3)    The third section shall examine America's political philosophy including, but not limited to, the influence of John Locke and Adam Smith on the founders; the concept of God-given rights; the Declaration of Independence; Thomas Paine's 'Common Sense'; the arguments for and against independence in Congress; the vote on independence; Thomas Jefferson and the drafting of the Declaration; the creation of American republics, including the nature of republics, the idea of sovereignty and the sovereignty of the people, the first state constitutions, and the Articles of Confederation as a cooperative compact between independent republics; the implementation of republican ideals in law, including the protection of natural and civil rights, exemplified by the Virginia Bill of Rights, the emergence of antislavery sentiment, exemplified by the Pennsylvania Act for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery, the spread of religious liberty, exemplified by the Virginia Statute of Religious Freedom, and expanded opportunities for personal independence through land ownership, exemplified by the Northwest Ordinance; the framing and implementation of the United States Constitution, including Shays' Rebellion, the problem of the public debt, the Federal Convention, the ratification of the United States Constitution, including the debates between the Federalists and the Antifederalists, the inauguration of George Washington, adoption of the Bill of Rights, including the philosophical underpinnings of each amendment as expressed by the founders and George Washington's Farewell Address; and

        (4)    The fourth section shall examine the legacy of the American Revolution. The aim of this section is to ensure that students understand how the ideals of the American Revolution have shaped American life for nearly two hundred and fifty years. This section is not a substitute for instruction on American national history, but instead provides a framework for understanding the enduring and pervasive influence of the Revolution. The topics covered shall include the Revolution and American national identity, embodied in shared national history, symbols, and common heroes, as well as the relationship of the Revolution and its ideals to expanding political participation, the abolition of slavery, and the campaign for women's rights. This section also shall distinguish between Americanism and Communism, including the philosophical differences on the right to free speech, the right to bear arms and the right to religious expression and private property. The brutal rise of communism also must be studied, including an overview of the Bolshevik Revolution, the Berlin Wall and the Berlin Airlift, the Mao Revolution, and the Tiananmen Square protest. The broad purpose of this subsection is to ensure that students understand the enduring influence of the American Revolution in U.S. history including its foreign policy."

SECTION    2.    Section 59-29-130 of the 1976 Code is amended to read:

    "Section 59-29-130.    The instruction provided for in Section 59-29-120(A) shall must be given for at least one year of the high school, college and university grades, respectively in public institutions of higher learning. In addition to the instructional requirements provided in Section 59-29-120(D), each topic listed within that subsection must be fully covered at least once every three years except that instruction on the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, and the United States Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, must be provided annually."

SECTION    3.    Section 59-29-140 of the 1976 Code is amended to read:

    "Section 59-29-140.    The State Superintendent of Education shall make due arrangements for carrying out the provisions of Sections 59-29-120 and 59-29-130. For such purpose the State Superintendent shall prescribe suitable texts adapted to the needs of the high schools, universities and colleges for the instruction required under Sections 59-29-120 and 59-29-130, and shall include materials from the American Revolution Institute, Hillsdale College, the Heritage Foundation, and the Centennial History of the United States by James D. McCabe."

SECTION    4.    Section 59-29-155(A) and (B) of the 1976 Code is amended to read:

    "(A)    The State Board of Education and Education Oversight Committee shall incorporate instruction on the founding principles that shaped the United States into the required study of the United States Constitution as provided in Section 59-29-120, and the South Carolina Social Studies Standards upon the next cyclical review. The board and committee shall include, at a minimum, the Federalist Papers and instruction on the structure of government and the role of the separation of powers and the freedoms guaranteed by the Bill of Rights to the United States Constitution.

    (B)    The State Department of Education biennially shall submit a report by October fifteenth of each odd-numbered year, commencing in 2017 2021, to the Senate Education Committee and the House Education and Public Works Committee documenting the implementation of this section."

SECTION    5.    This act takes effect on July 1, 2021.

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