Bill Text: CA AB3286 | 2023-2024 | Regular Session | Amended


Bill Title: California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018: monetary thresholds: grants.

Spectrum: Committee Bill

Status: (Engrossed) 2024-05-16 - In Senate. Read first time. To Com. on RLS. for assignment. [AB3286 Detail]

Download: California-2023-AB3286-Amended.html

Amended  IN  Assembly  April 25, 2024

CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2023–2024 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill
No. 3286


Introduced by Committee on Privacy and Consumer Protection

March 18, 2024


An act to amend Sections 1798.106, 1798.121, 1798.130, 1798.135, 1798.140, 1798.150, 1798.155, 1798.160, 1798.185, 1798.199.25, 1798.199.40, 1798.199.45, 1798.199.90, and 1798.199.95 of the Civil Code, relating to privacy.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 3286, as amended, Committee on Privacy and Consumer Protection. California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018: monetary thresholds: grants.
The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (CCPA) grants to a consumer various rights with respect to personal information, as defined, that is collected by a business, as defined, including the right to request that a business delete personal information about the consumer that the business has collected from the consumer. The California Privacy Rights Act of 2020, an initiative measure approved by the voters as Proposition 24 at the November 3, 2020, statewide general election, amended, added to, and reenacted the CCPA. The CCPA establishes the California Privacy Protection Agency with full administrative power, authority, and jurisdiction to implement and enforce the CCPA. The CCPA imposes certain responsibilities on the Attorney General, including adjusting the monetary thresholds of specified code sections in January of every odd-numbered year to reflect any increase in the Consumer Price Index.
This bill would remove that responsibility from the Attorney General and would instead require the agency to determine and apply the percentage change in the Consumer Price Index for the monetary thresholds, as prescribed.
The CCPA creates the Consumer Privacy Fund in the State Treasury and makes moneys in the fund available upon appropriation by the Legislature first to offset any costs incurred by the state courts in connection with actions brought to enforce the CCPA, the costs incurred by the Attorney General in carrying out the Attorney General’s duties under the CCPA, and then for the purposes of establishing an investment fund in the State Treasury, with any earnings or interest from the fund to be deposited in the General Fund, and making grants to promote and protect consumer privacy, educate children in the area of online privacy, and fund cooperative programs with international law enforcement organizations to combat fraudulent activities with respect to consumer data breaches, as prescribed. The CCPA annually appropriates from the General Fund of the state to the agency the sum of $10,000,000 adjusted for cost-of-living changes for expenditure to support the operations of the agency pursuant to the CCPA.
This bill would additionally authorize moneys in the fund to be available upon appropriation by the Legislature to offset the costs incurred by the agency in carrying out its duties under the CCPA and would require the agency to begin administering the grant program referred to above when the amount of grant funds available after all other distributions have been made in accordance with the provisions described above exceeds $300,000. The bill would require, in a fiscal year in which the amount of funds available for those grants is less than $300,000, the funds available for grants to remain in the fund and preserved for future year appropriations for the purpose of making the grants until the total funds accrued for that purpose after all other distributions have been made exceeds $300,000.
The CCPA authorizes the agency to, upon the sworn complaint of any person or on its own initiative, investigate possible violations of the CCPA relating to any business, service provider, contractor, or person. The CCPA requires the agency to notify in writing the person who made the complaint of the action, if any, the agency has taken or plans to take on the complaint, together with the reasons for that action or nonaction.
This bill would specify that the written notification shall exclude information that is subject to law enforcement exemptions and privileges, as specified.
This bill would declare that its provisions further the purposes and intent of the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: YES   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 Section 1798.106 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.106.
 Consumers’ Right to Correct Inaccurate Personal Information
(a) A consumer shall have the right to request a business that maintains inaccurate personal information about the consumer to correct that inaccurate personal information, taking into account the nature of the personal information and the purposes of the processing of the personal information.
(b) A business that collects personal information about consumers shall disclose, pursuant to Section 1798.130, the consumer’s right to request correction of inaccurate personal information.
(c) A business that receives a verifiable consumer request to correct inaccurate personal information shall use commercially reasonable efforts to correct the inaccurate personal information as directed by the consumer, pursuant to Section 1798.130 and regulations adopted pursuant to paragraph (7) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185.

SEC. 2.

 Section 1798.121 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.121.
 Consumers’ Right to Limit Use and Disclosure of Sensitive Personal Information
(a) A consumer shall have the right, at any time, to direct a business that collects sensitive personal information about the consumer to limit its use of the consumer’s sensitive personal information to that use which is necessary to perform the services or provide the goods reasonably expected by an average consumer who requests those goods or services, to perform the services set forth in paragraphs (2), (4), (5), and (8) of subdivision (e) of Section 1798.140, and as authorized by regulations adopted pursuant to subparagraph (C) of paragraph (18) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185. A business that uses or discloses a consumer’s sensitive personal information for purposes other than those specified in this subdivision shall provide notice to consumers, pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 1798.135, that this information may be used, or disclosed to a service provider or contractor, for additional, specified purposes and that consumers have the right to limit the use or disclosure of their sensitive personal information.
(b) A business that has received direction from a consumer not to use or disclose the consumer’s sensitive personal information, except as authorized by subdivision (a), shall be prohibited, pursuant to paragraph (4) of subdivision (c) of Section 1798.135, from using or disclosing the consumer’s sensitive personal information for any other purpose after its receipt of the consumer’s direction unless the consumer subsequently provides consent for the use or disclosure of the consumer’s sensitive personal information for additional purposes.
(c) A service provider or contractor that assists a business in performing the purposes authorized by subdivision (a) may not use the sensitive personal information after it has received instructions from the business and to the extent it has actual knowledge that the personal information is sensitive personal information for any other purpose. A service provider or contractor is only required to limit its use of sensitive personal information received pursuant to a written contract with the business in response to instructions from the business and only with respect to its relationship with that business.
(d) Sensitive personal information that is collected or processed without the purpose of inferring characteristics about a consumer is not subject to this section, as further defined in regulations adopted pursuant to subparagraph (C) of paragraph (18) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185, and shall be treated as personal information for purposes of all other sections of this act, including Section 1798.100.

SEC. 3.

 Section 1798.130 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.130.
 Notice, Disclosure, Correction, and Deletion Requirements
(a) In order to comply with Sections 1798.100, 1798.105, 1798.106, 1798.110, 1798.115, and 1798.125, a business shall, in a form that is reasonably accessible to consumers:
(1) (A) Make available to consumers two or more designated methods for submitting requests for information required to be disclosed pursuant to Sections 1798.110 and 1798.115, or requests for deletion or correction pursuant to Sections 1798.105 and 1798.106, respectively, including, at a minimum, a toll-free telephone number. A business that operates exclusively online and has a direct relationship with a consumer from whom it collects personal information shall only be required to provide an email address for submitting requests for information required to be disclosed pursuant to Sections 1798.110 and 1798.115, or for requests for deletion or correction pursuant to Sections 1798.105 and 1798.106, respectively.
(B) If the business maintains an internet website, make the internet website available to consumers to submit requests for information required to be disclosed pursuant to Sections 1798.110 and 1798.115, or requests for deletion or correction pursuant to Sections 1798.105 and 1798.106, respectively.
(2) (A) Disclose and deliver the required information to a consumer free of charge, correct inaccurate personal information, or delete a consumer’s personal information, based on the consumer’s request, within 45 days of receiving a verifiable consumer request from the consumer. The business shall promptly take steps to determine whether the request is a verifiable consumer request, but this shall not extend the business’s business’ duty to disclose and deliver the information, to correct inaccurate personal information, or to delete personal information within 45 days of receipt of the consumer’s request. The time period to provide the required information, to correct inaccurate personal information, or to delete personal information may be extended once by an additional 45 days when reasonably necessary, provided the consumer is provided notice of the extension within the first 45-day period. The disclosure of the required information shall be made in writing and delivered through the consumer’s account with the business, if the consumer maintains an account with the business, or by mail or electronically at the consumer’s option if the consumer does not maintain an account with the business, in a readily useable format that allows the consumer to transmit this information from one entity to another entity without hindrance. The business may require authentication of the consumer that is reasonable in light of the nature of the personal information requested, but shall not require the consumer to create an account with the business in order to make a verifiable consumer request provided that if the consumer, has an account with the business, the business may require the consumer to use that account to submit a verifiable consumer request.
(B) The disclosure of the required information shall cover the 12-month period preceding the business’ receipt of the verifiable consumer request provided that, upon the adoption of a regulation pursuant to paragraph (8) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185, a consumer may request that the business disclose the required information beyond the 12-month period, and the business shall be required to provide that information unless doing so proves impossible or would involve a disproportionate effort. A consumer’s right to request required information beyond the 12-month period, and a business’s business’ obligation to provide that information, shall only apply to personal information collected on or after January 1, 2022. Nothing in this subparagraph shall require a business to keep personal information for any length of time.
(3) (A) A business that receives a verifiable consumer request pursuant to Section 1798.110 or 1798.115 shall disclose any personal information it has collected about a consumer, directly or indirectly, including through or by a service provider or contractor, to the consumer. A service provider or contractor shall not be required to comply with a verifiable consumer request received directly from a consumer or a consumer’s authorized agent, pursuant to Section 1798.110 or 1798.115, to the extent that the service provider or contractor has collected personal information about the consumer in its role as a service provider or contractor. A service provider or contractor shall provide assistance to a business with which it has a contractual relationship with respect to the business’ response to a verifiable consumer request, including, but not limited to, by providing to the business the consumer’s personal information in the service provider or contractor’s possession, which the service provider or contractor obtained as a result of providing services to the business, and by correcting inaccurate information or by enabling the business to do the same. A service provider or contractor that collects personal information pursuant to a written contract with a business shall be required to assist the business through appropriate technical and organizational measures in complying with the requirements of subdivisions (d) to (f), inclusive, of Section 1798.100, taking into account the nature of the processing.
(B) For purposes of subdivision (b) of Section 1798.110:
(i) To identify the consumer, associate the information provided by the consumer in the verifiable consumer request to any personal information previously collected by the business about the consumer.
(ii) Identify by category or categories the personal information collected about the consumer for the applicable period of time by reference to the enumerated category or categories in subdivision (c) that most closely describes the personal information collected; the categories of sources from which the consumer’s personal information was collected; the business or commercial purpose for collecting, selling, or sharing the consumer’s personal information; and the categories of third parties to whom the business discloses the consumer’s personal information.
(iii) Provide the specific pieces of personal information obtained from the consumer in a format that is easily understandable to the average consumer, and to the extent technically feasible, in a structured, commonly used, machine-readable format that may also be transmitted to another entity at the consumer’s request without hindrance. “Specific pieces of information” do not include data generated to help ensure security and integrity or as prescribed by regulation. Personal information is not considered to have been disclosed by a business when a consumer instructs a business to transfer the consumer’s personal information from one business to another in the context of switching services.
(4) For purposes of subdivision (b) of Section 1798.115:
(A) Identify the consumer and associate the information provided by the consumer in the verifiable consumer request to any personal information previously collected by the business about the consumer.
(B) Identify by category or categories the personal information of the consumer that the business sold or shared during the applicable period of time by reference to the enumerated category in subdivision (c) that most closely describes the personal information, and provide the categories of third parties to whom the consumer’s personal information was sold or shared during the applicable period of time by reference to the enumerated category or categories in subdivision (c) that most closely describes the personal information sold or shared. The business shall disclose the information in a list that is separate from a list generated for the purposes of subparagraph (C).
(C) Identify by category or categories the personal information of the consumer that the business disclosed for a business purpose during the applicable period of time by reference to the enumerated category or categories in subdivision (c) that most closely describes the personal information, and provide the categories of persons to whom the consumer’s personal information was disclosed for a business purpose during the applicable period of time by reference to the enumerated category or categories in subdivision (c) that most closely describes the personal information disclosed. The business shall disclose the information in a list that is separate from a list generated for the purposes of subparagraph (B).
(5) Disclose the following information in its online privacy policy or policies if the business has an online privacy policy or policies and in any California-specific description of consumers’ privacy rights, or if the business does not maintain those policies, on its internet website, and update that information at least once every 12 months:
(A) A description of a consumer’s rights pursuant to Sections 1798.100, 1798.105, 1798.106, 1798.110, 1798.115, and 1798.125 and two or more designated methods for submitting requests, except as provided in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a).
(B) For purposes of subdivision (c) of Section 1798.110:
(i) A list of the categories of personal information it has collected about consumers in the preceding 12 months by reference to the enumerated category or categories in subdivision (c) that most closely describe the personal information collected.
(ii) The categories of sources from which consumers’ personal information is collected.
(iii) The business or commercial purpose for collecting, selling, or sharing consumers’ personal information.
(iv) The categories of third parties to whom the business discloses consumers’ personal information.
(C) For purposes of paragraphs (1) and (2) of subdivision (c) of Section 1798.115, two separate lists:
(i) A list of the categories of personal information it has sold or shared about consumers in the preceding 12 months by reference to the enumerated category or categories in subdivision (c) that most closely describe the personal information sold or shared, or if the business has not sold or shared consumers’ personal information in the preceding 12 months, the business shall prominently disclose that fact in its privacy policy.
(ii) A list of the categories of personal information it has disclosed about consumers for a business purpose in the preceding 12 months by reference to the enumerated category in subdivision (c) that most closely describes the personal information disclosed, or if the business has not disclosed consumers’ personal information for a business purpose in the preceding 12 months, the business shall disclose that fact.
(6) Ensure that all individuals responsible for handling consumer inquiries about the business’ privacy practices or the business’ compliance with this title are informed of all requirements in Sections 1798.100, 1798.105, 1798.106, 1798.110, 1798.115, 1798.125, and this section, and how to direct consumers to exercise their rights under those sections.
(7) Use any personal information collected from the consumer in connection with the business’ verification of the consumer’s request solely for the purposes of verification and shall not further disclose the personal information, retain it longer than necessary for purposes of verification, or use it for unrelated purposes.
(b) A business is not obligated to provide the information required by Sections 1798.110 and 1798.115 to the same consumer more than twice in a 12-month period.
(c) The categories of personal information required to be disclosed pursuant to Sections 1798.100, 1798.110, and 1798.115 shall follow the definitions of personal information and sensitive personal information in Section 1798.140 by describing the categories of personal information using the specific terms set forth in subparagraphs (A) to (K), inclusive, of paragraph (1) of subdivision (v) of Section 1798.140 and by describing the categories of sensitive personal information using the specific terms set forth in paragraphs (1) to (9), inclusive, of subdivision (ae) of Section 1798.140.

SEC. 4.

 Section 1798.135 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.135.
 Methods of Limiting Sale, Sharing, and Use of Personal Information and Use of Sensitive Personal Information
(a) A business that sells or shares consumers’ personal information or uses or discloses consumers’ sensitive personal information for purposes other than those authorized by subdivision (a) of Section 1798.121 shall, in a form that is reasonably accessible to consumers:
(1) Provide a clear and conspicuous link on the business’s business’ internet homepages, titled “Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information,” to an internet web page that enables a consumer, or a person authorized by the consumer, to opt-out opt out of the sale or sharing of the consumer’s personal information.
(2) Provide a clear and conspicuous link on the business’ internet homepages, titled “Limit the Use of My Sensitive Personal Information,” that enables a consumer, or a person authorized by the consumer, to limit the use or disclosure of the consumer’s sensitive personal information to those uses authorized by subdivision (a) of Section 1798.121.
(3) At the business’ discretion, utilize a single, clearly labeled link on the business’ internet homepages, in lieu of complying with paragraphs (1) and (2), if that link easily allows a consumer to opt out of the sale or sharing of the consumer’s personal information and to limit the use or disclosure of the consumer’s sensitive personal information.
(4) In the event that a business responds to opt-out requests received pursuant to paragraph (1), (2), or (3) by informing the consumer of a charge for the use of any product or service, present the terms of any financial incentive offered pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 1798.125 for the retention, use, sale, or sharing of the consumer’s personal information.
(b) (1) A business shall not be required to comply with subdivision (a) if the business allows consumers to opt out of the sale or sharing of their personal information and to limit the use of their sensitive personal information through an opt-out preference signal sent with the consumer’s consent by a platform, technology, or mechanism, based on technical specifications set forth in regulations adopted pursuant to paragraph (19) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185, to the business indicating the consumer’s intent to opt out of the business’ sale or sharing of the consumer’s personal information or to limit the use or disclosure of the consumer’s sensitive personal information, or both.
(2) A business that allows consumers to opt out of the sale or sharing of their personal information and to limit the use of their sensitive personal information pursuant to paragraph (1) may provide a link to a web page that enables the consumer to consent to the business ignoring the opt-out preference signal with respect to that business’ sale or sharing of the consumer’s personal information or the use of the consumer’s sensitive personal information for additional purposes provided that:
(A) The consent web page also allows the consumer or a person authorized by the consumer to revoke the consent as easily as it is affirmatively provided.
(B) The link to the web page does not degrade the consumer’s experience on the web page the consumer intends to visit and has a similar look, feel, and size relative to other links on the same web page.
(C) The consent web page complies with technical specifications set forth in regulations adopted pursuant to paragraph (19) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185.
(3) A business that complies with subdivision (a) is not required to comply with subdivision (b). For the purposes of clarity, a business may elect whether to comply with subdivision (a) or subdivision (b).
(c) A business that is subject to this section shall:
(1) Not require a consumer to create an account or provide additional information beyond what is necessary in order to direct the business not to sell or share the consumer’s personal information or to limit use or disclosure of the consumer’s sensitive personal information.
(2) Include a description of a consumer’s rights pursuant to Sections 1798.120 and 1798.121, along with a separate link to the “Do Not Sell or Share My Personal Information” internet web page and a separate link to the “Limit the Use of My Sensitive Personal Information” internet web page, if applicable, or a single link to both choices, or a statement that the business responds to and abides by opt-out preference signals sent by a platform, technology, or mechanism in accordance with subdivision (b), in:
(A) Its online privacy policy or policies if the business has an online privacy policy or policies.
(B) Any California-specific description of consumers’ privacy rights.
(3) Ensure that all individuals responsible for handling consumer inquiries about the business’s business’ privacy practices or the business’s business’ compliance with this title are informed of all requirements in Sections 1798.120, 1798.121, and this section and how to direct consumers to exercise their rights under those sections.
(4) For consumers who exercise their right to opt-out opt out of the sale or sharing of their personal information or limit the use or disclosure of their sensitive personal information, refrain from selling or sharing the consumer’s personal information or using or disclosing the consumer’s sensitive personal information and wait for at least 12 months before requesting that the consumer authorize the sale or sharing of the consumer’s personal information or the use and disclosure of the consumer’s sensitive personal information for additional purposes, or as authorized by regulations.
(5) For consumers under 16 years of age who do not consent to the sale or sharing of their personal information, refrain from selling or sharing the personal information of the consumer under 16 years of age and wait for at least 12 months before requesting the consumer’s consent again, or as authorized by regulations or until the consumer attains 16 years of age.
(6) Use any personal information collected from the consumer in connection with the submission of the consumer’s opt-out request solely for the purposes of complying with the opt-out request.
(d) Nothing in this title shall be construed to require a business to comply with the title by including the required links and text on the homepage that the business makes available to the public generally, if the business maintains a separate and additional homepage that is dedicated to California consumers and that includes the required links and text, and the business takes reasonable steps to ensure that California consumers are directed to the homepage for California consumers and not the homepage made available to the public generally.
(e) A consumer may authorize another person to opt-out opt out of the sale or sharing of the consumer’s personal information and to limit the use of the consumer’s sensitive personal information on the consumer’s behalf, including through an opt-out preference signal, as defined in paragraph (1) of subdivision (b), indicating the consumer’s intent to opt out, and a business shall comply with an opt-out request received from a person authorized by the consumer to act on the consumer’s behalf, pursuant to regulations adopted by the Attorney General regardless of whether the business has elected to comply with subdivision (a) or (b). For purposes of clarity, a business that elects to comply with subdivision (a) may respond to the consumer’s opt-out consistent request consistently with Section 1798.125.
(f) If a business communicates a consumer’s opt-out request to any person authorized by the business to collect personal information, the person shall thereafter only use that consumer’s personal information for a business purpose specified by the business, or as otherwise permitted by this title, and shall be prohibited from:
(1) Selling or sharing the personal information.
(2) Retaining, using, or disclosing that consumer’s personal information.
(A) For any purpose other than for the specific purpose of performing the services offered to the business.
(B) Outside of the direct business relationship between the person and the business.
(C) For a commercial purpose other than providing the services to the business.
(g) A business that communicates a consumer’s opt-out request to a person pursuant to subdivision (f) shall not be liable under this title if the person receiving the opt-out request violates the restrictions set forth in the title provided that, at the time of communicating the opt-out request, the business does not have actual knowledge, or reason to believe, that the person intends to commit such a violation. Any provision of a contract or agreement of any kind that purports to waive or limit in any way this subdivision shall be void and unenforceable.

SEC. 5.

 Section 1798.140 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.140.
 Definitions
For purposes of this title:
(a) “Advertising and marketing” means a communication by a business or a person acting on the business’ behalf in any medium intended to induce a consumer to obtain goods, services, or employment.
(b) “Aggregate consumer information” means information that relates to a group or category of consumers, from which individual consumer identities have been removed, that is not linked or reasonably linkable to any consumer or household, including via a device. “Aggregate consumer information” does not mean one or more individual consumer records that have been deidentified.
(c) “Biometric information” means an individual’s physiological, biological, or behavioral characteristics, including information pertaining to an individual’s deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), that is used or is intended to be used singly or in combination with each other or with other identifying data, to establish individual identity. Biometric information includes, but is not limited to, imagery of the iris, retina, fingerprint, face, hand, palm, vein patterns, and voice recordings, from which an identifier template, such as a faceprint, a minutiae template, or a voiceprint, can be extracted, and keystroke patterns or rhythms, gait patterns or rhythms, and sleep, health, or exercise data that contain identifying information.
(d) “Business” means:
(1) A sole proprietorship, partnership, limited liability company, corporation, association, or other legal entity that is organized or operated for the profit or financial benefit of its shareholders or other owners, that collects consumers’ personal information, or on the behalf of which such information is collected and that alone, or jointly with others, determines the purposes and means of the processing of consumers’ personal information, that does business in the State of California, and that satisfies one or more of the following thresholds:
(A) As of January 1 of the calendar year, had annual gross revenues in excess of twenty-five million dollars ($25,000,000) in the preceding calendar year, as adjusted pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 1798.199.95.
(B) Alone or in combination, annually buys, sells, or shares the personal information of 100,000 or more consumers or households.
(C) Derives 50 percent or more of its annual revenues from selling or sharing consumers’ personal information.
(2) Any entity that controls or is controlled by a business, as defined in paragraph (1), and that shares common branding with the business and with whom the business shares consumers’ personal information. “Control” or “controlled” means ownership of, or the power to vote, more than 50 percent of the outstanding shares of any class of voting security of a business; control in any manner over the election of a majority of the directors, or of individuals exercising similar functions; or the power to exercise a controlling influence over the management of a company. “Common branding” means a shared name, servicemark, or trademark that the average consumer would understand that two or more entities are commonly owned.
(3) A joint venture or partnership composed of businesses in which each business has at least a 40 percent interest. For purposes of this title, the joint venture or partnership and each business that composes the joint venture or partnership shall separately be considered a single business, except that personal information in the possession of each business and disclosed to the joint venture or partnership shall not be shared with the other business.
(4) A person that does business in California, that is not covered by paragraph (1), (2), or (3), and that voluntarily certifies to the California Privacy Protection Agency that it is in compliance with, and agrees to be bound by, this title.
(e) “Business purpose” means the use of personal information for the business’ operational purposes, or other notified purposes, or for the service provider or contractor’s operational purposes, as defined by regulations adopted pursuant to paragraph (10) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185, provided that the use of personal information shall be reasonably necessary and proportionate to achieve the purpose for which the personal information was collected or processed or for another purpose that is compatible with the context in which the personal information was collected. Business purposes are:
(1) Auditing related to counting ad impressions to unique visitors, verifying positioning and quality of ad impressions, and auditing compliance with this specification and other standards.
(2) Helping to ensure security and integrity to the extent the use of the consumer’s personal information is reasonably necessary and proportionate for these purposes.
(3) Debugging to identify and repair errors that impair existing intended functionality.
(4) Short-term, transient use, including, but not limited to, nonpersonalized advertising shown as part of a consumer’s current interaction with the business, provided that the consumer’s personal information is not disclosed to another third party and is not used to build a profile about the consumer or otherwise alter the consumer’s experience outside the current interaction with the business.
(5) Performing services on behalf of the business, including maintaining or servicing accounts, providing customer service, processing or fulfilling orders and transactions, verifying customer information, processing payments, providing financing, providing analytic services, providing storage, or providing similar services on behalf of the business.
(6) Providing advertising and marketing services, except for cross-context behavioral advertising, to the consumer provided that, for the purpose of advertising and marketing, a service provider or contractor shall not combine the personal information of opted-out consumers that the service provider or contractor receives from, or on behalf of, the business with personal information that the service provider or contractor receives from, or on behalf of, another person or persons or collects from its own interaction with consumers.
(7) Undertaking internal research for technological development and demonstration.
(8) Undertaking activities to verify or maintain the quality or safety of a service or device that is owned, manufactured, manufactured for, or controlled by the business, and to improve, upgrade, or enhance the service or device that is owned, manufactured, manufactured for, or controlled by the business.
(f) “Collects,” “collected,” or “collection” means buying, renting, gathering, obtaining, receiving, or accessing any personal information pertaining to a consumer by any means. This includes receiving information from the consumer, either actively or passively, or by observing the consumer’s behavior.
(g) “Commercial purposes” means to advance a person’s commercial or economic interests, such as by inducing another person to buy, rent, lease, join, subscribe to, provide, or exchange products, goods, property, information, or services, or enabling or effecting, directly or indirectly, a commercial transaction.
(h) “Consent” means any freely given, specific, informed, and unambiguous indication of the consumer’s wishes by which the consumer, or the consumer’s legal guardian, a person who has power of attorney, or a person acting as a conservator for the consumer, including by a statement or by a clear affirmative action, signifies agreement to the processing of personal information relating to the consumer for a narrowly defined particular purpose. Acceptance of a general or broad terms of use, or similar document, that contains descriptions of personal information processing along with other, unrelated information, does not constitute consent. Hovering over, muting, pausing, or closing a given piece of content does not constitute consent. Likewise, agreement obtained through use of dark patterns does not constitute consent.
(i) “Consumer” means a natural person who is a California resident, as defined in Section 17014 of Title 18 of the California Code of Regulations, as that section read on September 1, 2017, however identified, including by any unique identifier.
(j) (1) “Contractor” means a person to whom the business makes available a consumer’s personal information for a business purpose, pursuant to a written contract with the business, provided that the contract:
(A) Prohibits the contractor from:
(i) Selling or sharing the personal information.
(ii) Retaining, using, or disclosing the personal information for any purpose other than for the business purposes specified in the contract, including retaining, using, or disclosing the personal information for a commercial purpose other than the business purposes specified in the contract, or as otherwise permitted by this title.
(iii) Retaining, using, or disclosing the information outside of the direct business relationship between the contractor and the business.
(iv) Combining the personal information that the contractor receives pursuant to a written contract with the business with personal information that it receives from or on behalf of another person or persons, or collects from its own interaction with the consumer, provided that the contractor may combine personal information to perform any business purpose as defined in regulations adopted pursuant to paragraph (9) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185, except as provided for in paragraph (6) of subdivision (e) and in regulations adopted by the California Privacy Protection Agency.
(B) Includes a certification made by the contractor that the contractor understands the restrictions in subparagraph (A) and will comply with them.
(C) Permits, subject to agreement with the contractor, the business to monitor the contractor’s compliance with the contract through measures, including, but not limited to, ongoing manual reviews and automated scans and regular assessments, audits, or other technical and operational testing at least once every 12 months.
(2) If a contractor engages any other person to assist it in processing personal information for a business purpose on behalf of the business, or if any other person engaged by the contractor engages another person to assist in processing personal information for that business purpose, it shall notify the business of that engagement, and the engagement shall be pursuant to a written contract binding the other person to observe all the requirements set forth in paragraph (1).
(k) “Cross-context behavioral advertising” means the targeting of advertising to a consumer based on the consumer’s personal information obtained from the consumer’s activity across businesses, distinctly branded internet websites, applications, or services, other than the business, distinctly branded internet website, application, or service with which the consumer intentionally interacts.
(l) “Dark pattern” means a user interface designed or manipulated with the substantial effect of subverting or impairing user autonomy, decisionmaking, or choice, as further defined by regulation.
(m) “Deidentified” means information that cannot reasonably be used to infer information about, or otherwise be linked to, a particular consumer provided that the business that possesses the information:
(1) Takes reasonable measures to ensure that the information cannot be associated with a consumer or household.
(2) Publicly commits to maintain and use the information in deidentified form and not to attempt to reidentify the information, except that the business may attempt to reidentify the information solely for the purpose of determining whether its deidentification processes satisfy the requirements of this subdivision.
(3) Contractually obligates any recipients of the information to comply with all provisions of this subdivision.
(n) “Designated methods for submitting requests” means a mailing address, email address, internet web page, internet web portal, toll-free telephone number, or other applicable contact information, whereby consumers may submit a request or direction under this title, and any new, consumer-friendly means of contacting a business, as approved by the Attorney General pursuant to Section 1798.185.
(o) “Device” means any physical object that is capable of connecting to the Internet, internet, directly or indirectly, or to another device.
(p) “Homepage” means the introductory page of an internet website and any internet web page where personal information is collected. In the case of an online service, such as a mobile application, homepage means the application’s platform page or download page, a link within the application, such as from the application configuration, “About,” “Information,’’ or settings page, and any other location that allows consumers to review the notices required by this title, including, but not limited to, before downloading the application.
(q) “Household” means a group, however identified, of consumers who cohabitate with one another at the same residential address and share use of common devices or services.
(r) “Infer” or “inference” means the derivation of information, data, assumptions, or conclusions from facts, evidence, or another source of information or data.
(s) “Intentionally interacts” means when the consumer intends to interact with a person, or disclose personal information to a person, via one or more deliberate interactions, including visiting the person’s internet website or purchasing a good or service from the person. Hovering over, muting, pausing, or closing a given piece of content does not constitute a consumer’s intent to interact with a person.
(t) “Nonpersonalized advertising” means advertising and marketing that is based solely on a consumer’s personal information derived from the consumer’s current interaction with the business with the exception of the consumer’s precise geolocation.
(u) “Person” means an individual, proprietorship, firm, partnership, joint venture, syndicate, business trust, company, corporation, limited liability company, association, committee, and any other organization or group of persons acting in concert.
(v) (1) “Personal information” means information that identifies, relates to, describes, is reasonably capable of being associated with, or could reasonably be linked, directly or indirectly, with a particular consumer or household. Personal information includes, but is not limited to, the following if it identifies, relates to, describes, is reasonably capable of being associated with, or could be reasonably linked, directly or indirectly, with a particular consumer or household:
(A) Identifiers such as a real name, alias, postal address, unique personal identifier, online identifier, Internet Protocol address, email address, account name, social security number, driver’s license number, passport number, or other similar identifiers.
(B) Any personal information described in subdivision (e) of Section 1798.80.
(C) Characteristics of protected classifications under California or federal law.
(D) Commercial information, including records of personal property, products or services purchased, obtained, or considered, or other purchasing or consuming histories or tendencies.
(E) Biometric information.
(F) Internet or other electronic network activity information, including, but not limited to, browsing history, search history, and information regarding a consumer’s interaction with an internet website application, or advertisement.
(G) Geolocation data.
(H) Audio, electronic, visual, thermal, olfactory, or similar information.
(I) Professional or employment-related information.
(J) Education information, defined as information that is not publicly available personally identifiable information as defined in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (20 U.S.C. Sec. 1232g; 34 C.F.R. Part 99).
(K) Inferences drawn from any of the information identified in this subdivision to create a profile about a consumer reflecting the consumer’s preferences, characteristics, psychological trends, predispositions, behavior, attitudes, intelligence, abilities, and aptitudes.
(L) Sensitive personal information.
(2) “Personal information” does not include publicly available information or lawfully obtained, truthful information that is a matter of public concern. For purposes of this paragraph, “publicly available” means: information that is lawfully made available from federal, state, or local government records, or information that a business has a reasonable basis to believe is lawfully made available to the general public by the consumer or from widely distributed media; or information made available by a person to whom the consumer has disclosed the information if the consumer has not restricted the information to a specific audience. “Publicly available” does not mean biometric information collected by a business about a consumer without the consumer’s knowledge.
(3) “Personal information” does not include consumer information that is deidentified or aggregate consumer information.
(w) “Precise geolocation” means any data that is derived from a device and that is used or intended to be used to locate a consumer within a geographic area that is equal to or less than the area of a circle with a radius of 1,850 feet, except as prescribed by regulations.
(x) “Probabilistic identifier” means the identification of a consumer or a consumer’s device to a degree of certainty of more probable than not based on any categories of personal information included in, or similar to, the categories enumerated in the definition of personal information.
(y) “Processing” means any operation or set of operations that are performed on personal information or on sets of personal information, whether or not by automated means.
(z) “Profiling” means any form of automated processing of personal information, as further defined by regulations pursuant to paragraph (15) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185, to evaluate certain personal aspects relating to a natural person and in particular to analyze or predict aspects concerning that natural person’s performance at work, economic situation, health, personal preferences, interests, reliability, behavior, location, or movements.
(aa) “Pseudonymize” or “Pseudonymization” means the processing of personal information in a manner that renders the personal information no longer attributable to a specific consumer without the use of additional information, provided that the additional information is kept separately and is subject to technical and organizational measures to ensure that the personal information is not attributed to an identified or identifiable consumer.
(ab) “Research” means scientific analysis, systematic study, and observation, including basic research or applied research that is designed to develop or contribute to public or scientific knowledge and that adheres or otherwise conforms to all other applicable ethics and privacy laws, including, but not limited to, studies conducted in the public interest in the area of public health. Research with personal information that may have been collected from a consumer in the course of the consumer’s interactions with a business’ service or device for other purposes shall be:
(1) Compatible with the business purpose for which the personal information was collected.
(2) Subsequently pseudonymized and deidentified, or deidentified and in the aggregate, such that the information cannot reasonably identify, relate to, describe, be capable of being associated with, or be linked, directly or indirectly, to a particular consumer, by a business.
(3) Made subject to technical safeguards that prohibit reidentification of the consumer to whom the information may pertain, other than as needed to support the research.
(4) Subject to business processes that specifically prohibit reidentification of the information, other than as needed to support the research.
(5) Made subject to business processes to prevent inadvertent release of deidentified information.
(6) Protected from any reidentification attempts.
(7) Used solely for research purposes that are compatible with the context in which the personal information was collected.
(8) Subjected by the business conducting the research to additional security controls that limit access to the research data to only those individuals as are necessary to carry out the research purpose.
(ac) “Security and integrity” means the ability of:
(1) Networks or information systems to detect security incidents that compromise the availability, authenticity, integrity, and confidentiality of stored or transmitted personal information.
(2) Businesses to detect security incidents, resist malicious, deceptive, fraudulent, or illegal actions and to help prosecute those responsible for those actions.
(3) Businesses to ensure the physical safety of natural persons.
(ad) (1) “Sell,” “selling,” “sale,” or “sold,’’ means selling, renting, releasing, disclosing, disseminating, making available, transferring, or otherwise communicating orally, in writing, or by electronic or other means, a consumer’s personal information by the business to a third party for monetary or other valuable consideration.
(2) For purposes of this title, a business does not sell personal information when:
(A) A consumer uses or directs the business to intentionally:
(i) Disclose personal information.
(ii) Interact with one or more third parties.
(B) The business uses or shares an identifier for a consumer who has opted out of the sale of the consumer’s personal information or limited the use of the consumer’s sensitive personal information for the purposes of alerting persons that the consumer has opted out of the sale of the consumer’s personal information or limited the use of the consumer’s sensitive personal information.
(C) The business transfers to a third party the personal information of a consumer as an asset that is part of a merger, acquisition, bankruptcy, or other transaction in which the third party assumes control of all or part of the business, provided that information is used or shared consistently with this title. If a third party materially alters how it uses or shares the personal information of a consumer in a manner that is materially inconsistent with the promises made at the time of collection, it shall provide prior notice of the new or changed practice to the consumer. The notice shall be sufficiently prominent and robust to ensure that existing consumers can easily exercise their choices consistently with this title. This subparagraph does not authorize a business to make material, retroactive privacy policy changes or make other changes in their privacy policy in a manner that would violate the Unfair and Deceptive Practices Act (Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 17200) of Part 2 of Division 7 of the Business and Professions Code).
(ae) “Sensitive personal information” means:
(1) Personal information that reveals:
(A) A consumer’s social security, driver’s license, state identification card, or passport number.
(B) A consumer’s account log-in, financial account, debit card, or credit card number in combination with any required security or access code, password, or credentials allowing access to an account.
(C) A consumer’s precise geolocation.
(D) A consumer’s racial or ethnic origin, citizenship or immigration status, religious or philosophical beliefs, or union membership.
(E) The contents of a consumer’s mail, email, and text messages unless the business is the intended recipient of the communication.
(F) A consumer’s genetic data.
(2) (A) The processing of biometric information for the purpose of uniquely identifying a consumer.
(B) Personal information collected and analyzed concerning a consumer’s health.
(C) Personal information collected and analyzed concerning a consumer’s sex life or sexual orientation.
(3) Sensitive personal information that is “publicly available” pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (v) shall not be considered sensitive personal information or personal information.
(af) “Service” or “services” means work, labor, and services, including services furnished in connection with the sale or repair of goods.
(ag) (1) “Service provider” means a person that processes personal information on behalf of a business and that receives from or on behalf of the business consumer’s personal information for a business purpose pursuant to a written contract, provided that the contract prohibits the person from:
(A) Selling or sharing the personal information.
(B) Retaining, using, or disclosing the personal information for any purpose other than for the business purposes specified in the contract for the business, including retaining, using, or disclosing the personal information for a commercial purpose other than the business purposes specified in the contract with the business, or as otherwise permitted by this title.
(C) Retaining, using, or disclosing the information outside of the direct business relationship between the service provider and the business.
(D) Combining the personal information that the service provider receives from, or on behalf of, the business with personal information that it receives from, or on behalf of, another person or persons, or collects from its own interaction with the consumer, provided that the service provider may combine personal information to perform any business purpose as defined in regulations adopted pursuant to paragraph (9) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185, except as provided for in paragraph (6) of subdivision (e) of this section and in regulations adopted by the California Privacy Protection Agency. The contract may, subject to agreement with the service provider, permit the business to monitor the service provider’s compliance with the contract through measures, including, but not limited to, ongoing manual reviews and automated scans and regular assessments, audits, or other technical and operational testing at least once every 12 months.
(2) If a service provider engages any other person to assist it in processing personal information for a business purpose on behalf of the business, or if any other person engaged by the service provider engages another person to assist in processing personal information for that business purpose, it shall notify the business of that engagement, and the engagement shall be pursuant to a written contract binding the other person to observe all the requirements set forth in paragraph (1).
(ah) (1) “Share,” “shared,” or “sharing” means sharing, renting, releasing, disclosing, disseminating, making available, transferring, or otherwise communicating orally, in writing, or by electronic or other means, a consumer’s personal information by the business to a third party for cross-context behavioral advertising, whether or not for monetary or other valuable consideration, including transactions between a business and a third party for cross-context behavioral advertising for the benefit of a business in which no money is exchanged.
(2) For purposes of this title, a business does not share personal information when:
(A) A consumer uses or directs the business to intentionally disclose personal information or intentionally interact with one or more third parties.
(B) The business uses or shares an identifier for a consumer who has opted out of the sharing of the consumer’s personal information or limited the use of the consumer’s sensitive personal information for the purposes of alerting persons that the consumer has opted out of the sharing of the consumer’s personal information or limited the use of the consumer’s sensitive personal information.
(C) The business transfers to a third party the personal information of a consumer as an asset that is part of a merger, acquisition, bankruptcy, or other transaction in which the third party assumes control of all or part of the business, provided that information is used or shared consistently with this title. If a third party materially alters how it uses or shares the personal information of a consumer in a manner that is materially inconsistent with the promises made at the time of collection, it shall provide prior notice of the new or changed practice to the consumer. The notice shall be sufficiently prominent and robust to ensure that existing consumers can easily exercise their choices consistently with this title. This subparagraph does not authorize a business to make material, retroactive privacy policy changes or make other changes in their privacy policy in a manner that would violate the Unfair and Deceptive Practices Act (Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 17200) of Part 2 of Division 7 of the Business and Professions Code).
(ai) “Third party” means a person who is not any of the following:
(1) The business with whom the consumer intentionally interacts and that collects personal information from the consumer as part of the consumer’s current interaction with the business under this title.
(2) A service provider to the business.
(3) A contractor.
(aj) “Unique identifier” or “unique personal identifier” means a persistent identifier that can be used to recognize a consumer, a family, or a device that is linked to a consumer or family, over time and across different services, including, but not limited to, a device identifier; an Internet Protocol address; cookies, beacons, pixel tags, mobile ad identifiers, or similar technology; customer number, unique pseudonym, or user alias; telephone numbers, or other forms of persistent or probabilistic identifiers that can be used to identify a particular consumer or device that is linked to a consumer or family. For purposes of this subdivision, “family” means a custodial parent or guardian and any children under 18 years of age over which the parent or guardian has custody.
(ak) “Verifiable consumer request” means a request that is made by a consumer, by a consumer on behalf of the consumer’s minor child, by a natural person or a person registered with the Secretary of State, authorized by the consumer to act on the consumer’s behalf, or by a person who has power of attorney or is acting as a conservator for the consumer, and that the business can verify, using commercially reasonable methods, pursuant to regulations adopted by the Attorney General pursuant to paragraph (6) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185 to be the consumer about whom the business has collected personal information. A business is not obligated to provide information to the consumer pursuant to Sections 1798.110 and 1798.115, to delete personal information pursuant to Section 1798.105, or to correct inaccurate personal information pursuant to Section 1798.106, if the business cannot verify, pursuant to this subdivision and regulations adopted by the Attorney General pursuant to paragraph (6) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185, that the consumer making the request is the consumer about whom the business has collected information or is a person authorized by the consumer to act on such consumer’s behalf.

SEC. 6.

 Section 1798.150 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.150.
 Personal Information Security Breaches
(a) (1) Any consumer whose nonencrypted and nonredacted personal information, as defined in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (d) of Section 1798.81.5, or whose email address in combination with a password or security question and answer that would permit access to the account is subject to an unauthorized access and exfiltration, theft, or disclosure as a result of the business’s business’ violation of the duty to implement and maintain reasonable security procedures and practices appropriate to the nature of the information to protect the personal information may institute a civil action for any of the following:
(A) To recover damages in an amount not less than one hundred dollars ($100) and not greater than seven hundred and fifty ($750) per consumer per incident or actual damages, whichever is greater. The amounts in this subdivision shall be adjusted pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 1798.199.95.
(B) Injunctive or declaratory relief.
(C) Any other relief the court deems proper.
(2) In assessing the amount of statutory damages, the court shall consider any one or more of the relevant circumstances presented by any of the parties to the case, including, but not limited to, the nature and seriousness of the misconduct, the number of violations, the persistence of the misconduct, the length of time over which the misconduct occurred, the willfulness of the defendant’s misconduct, and the defendant’s assets, liabilities, and net worth.
(b) Actions pursuant to this section may be brought by a consumer if, prior to initiating any action against a business for statutory damages on an individual or class-wide basis, a consumer provides a business 30 days’ written notice identifying the specific provisions of this title the consumer alleges have been or are being violated. In the event a cure is possible, if within the 30 days the business actually cures the noticed violation and provides the consumer an express written statement that the violations have been cured and that no further violations shall occur, no action for individual statutory damages or class-wide statutory damages may be initiated against the business. The implementation and maintenance of reasonable security procedures and practices pursuant to Section 1798.81.5 following a breach does not constitute a cure with respect to that breach. No notice shall be required prior to an individual consumer initiating an action solely for actual pecuniary damages suffered as a result of the alleged violations of this title. If a business continues to violate this title in breach of the express written statement provided to the consumer under this section, the consumer may initiate an action against the business to enforce the written statement and may pursue statutory damages for each breach of the express written statement, as well as any other violation of the title that postdates the written statement.
(c) The cause of action established by this section shall apply only to violations as defined in subdivision (a) and shall not be based on violations of any other section of this title. Nothing in this title shall be interpreted to serve as the basis for a private right of action under any other law. This shall not be construed to relieve any party from any duties or obligations imposed under other law or the United States or California Constitution.

SEC. 7.

 Section 1798.155 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.155.
 Administrative Enforcement
(a) Any business, service provider, contractor, or other person that violates this title shall be liable for an administrative fine of not more than two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500) for each violation or seven thousand five hundred dollars ($7,500) for each intentional violation or violations involving the personal information of consumers whom the business, service provider, contractor, or other person has actual knowledge are under 16 years of age, as adjusted pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 1798.199.95, in an administrative enforcement action brought by the California Privacy Protection Agency.
(b) Any administrative fine assessed for a violation of this title, and the proceeds of any settlement of an action brought pursuant to subdivision (a), shall be deposited in the Consumer Privacy Fund, created within the General Fund pursuant to subdivision (a) of Section 1798.160 with the intent to fully offset any costs incurred by the state courts, the Attorney General, and the California Privacy Protection Agency in connection with this title.

SEC. 8.

 Section 1798.160 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.160.
 Consumer Privacy Fund
(a) A special fund to be known as the “Consumer Privacy Fund” is hereby created within the General Fund in the State Treasury, and is available upon appropriation by the Legislature first to offset any costs incurred by the state courts in connection with actions brought to enforce this title, the costs incurred by the California Privacy Protection Agency in carrying out its duties under this title, the costs incurred by the Attorney General in carrying out the Attorney General’s duties under this title, and then for the purposes of establishing an investment fund in the State Treasury, with any earnings or interest from the fund to be deposited in the General Fund, and making grants to promote and protect consumer privacy, educate children in the area of online privacy, and fund cooperative programs with international law enforcement organizations to combat fraudulent activities with respect to consumer data breaches.
(b) Funds transferred to the Consumer Privacy Fund shall be used exclusively as follows:
(1) To offset any costs incurred by the state courts, the California Privacy Protection Agency, and the Attorney General in connection with this title.
(2) After satisfying the obligations under paragraph (1), the remaining funds shall be allocated each fiscal year as follows:
(A) Ninety-one percent shall be invested by the Treasurer in financial assets with the goal of maximizing long term long-term yields consistent with a prudent level of risk. The principal shall not be subject to transfer or appropriation, provided that any interest and earnings shall be transferred on an annual basis to the General Fund for appropriation by the Legislature for General Fund purposes.
(B) Subject to subdivision (d), 9 percent shall be made available to the California Privacy Protection Agency for the purposes of making grants in California, with 3 percent allocated to each of the following grant recipients:
(i) Nonprofit organizations to promote and protect consumer privacy.
(ii) Nonprofit organizations and public agencies, including school districts, to educate children in the area of online privacy.
(iii) State and local law enforcement agencies to fund cooperative programs with international law enforcement organizations to combat fraudulent activities with respect to consumer data breaches.
(c) Funds in the Consumer Privacy Fund shall not be subject to appropriation or transfer by the Legislature for any other purpose.
(d) (1) The California Privacy Protection Agency shall begin administering the grant program described in subparagraph (B) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (b) when the amount of grant funds available after all other distributions have been made in accordance with this section exceeds three hundred thousand dollars ($300,000).
(2) In a fiscal year in which the amount of funds available for grants pursuant to subparagraph (B) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (b) are equal to or less than three hundred thousand dollars ($300,000), the funds shall remain in the Consumer Privacy Fund and that amount shall be reserved for future year appropriations for the purpose of making grants pursuant to subparagraph (B) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (b) until the total funds accrued for that purpose after all other distributions have been made exceeds three hundred thousand dollars ($300,000).

SEC. 9.

 Section 1798.185 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.185.
 Regulations
(a) On or before July 1, 2020, the Attorney General shall solicit broad public participation and adopt regulations to further the purposes of this title, including, but not limited to, the following areas:
(1) Updating or adding categories of personal information to those enumerated in subdivision (c) of Section 1798.130 and subdivision (v) of Section 1798.140, and updating or adding categories of sensitive personal information to those enumerated in subdivision (ae) of Section 1798.140 in order to address changes in technology, data collection practices, obstacles to implementation, and privacy concerns.
(2) Updating as needed the definitions of “deidentified” and “unique identifier” to address changes in technology, data collection, obstacles to implementation, and privacy concerns, and adding, modifying, or deleting categories to the definition of designated methods for submitting requests to facilitate a consumer’s ability to obtain information from a business pursuant to Section 1798.130. The authority to update the definition of “deidentified” shall not apply to deidentification standards set forth in Section 164.514 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations, where such information previously was “protected health information” as defined in Section 160.103 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations.
(3) Establishing any exceptions necessary to comply with state or federal law, including, but not limited to, those relating to trade secrets and intellectual property rights, within one year of passage of this title and as needed thereafter, with the intention that trade secrets should not be disclosed in response to a verifiable consumer request.
(4) Establishing rules and procedures for the following:
(A) To facilitate and govern the submission of a request by a consumer to opt out of the sale or sharing of personal information pursuant to Section 1798.120 and to limit the use of a consumer’s sensitive personal information pursuant to Section 1798.121 to ensure that consumers have the ability to exercise their choices without undue burden and to prevent business from engaging in deceptive or harassing conduct, including in retaliation against consumers for exercising their rights, while allowing businesses to inform consumers of the consequences of their decision to opt out of the sale or sharing of their personal information or to limit the use of their sensitive personal information.
(B) To govern business compliance with a consumer’s opt-out request.
(C) For the development and use of a recognizable and uniform opt-out logo or button by all businesses to promote consumer awareness of the opportunity to opt out of the sale of personal information.
(5) Establishing rules, procedures, and any exceptions necessary to ensure that the notices and information that businesses are required to provide pursuant to this title are provided in a manner that may be easily understood by the average consumer, are accessible to consumers with disabilities, and are available in the language primarily used to interact with the consumer, including establishing rules and guidelines regarding financial incentives within one year of passage of this title and as needed thereafter.
(6) Establishing rules and procedures to further the purposes of Sections 1798.105, 1798.106, 1798.110, and 1798.115 and to facilitate a consumer’s or the consumer’s authorized agent’s ability to delete personal information, correct inaccurate personal information pursuant to Section 1798.106, or obtain information pursuant to Section 1798.130, with the goal of minimizing the administrative burden on consumers, taking into account available technology, security concerns, and the burden on the business, to govern a business’s business’ determination that a request for information received from a consumer is a verifiable consumer request, including treating a request submitted through a password-protected account maintained by the consumer with the business while the consumer is logged into the account as a verifiable consumer request and providing a mechanism for a consumer who does not maintain an account with the business to request information through the business’s business’ authentication of the consumer’s identity, within one year of passage of this title and as needed thereafter.
(7) Establishing how often, and under what circumstances, a consumer may request a correction pursuant to Section 1798.106, including standards governing the following:
(A) How a business responds to a request for correction, including exceptions for requests to which a response is impossible or would involve disproportionate effort, and requests for correction of accurate information.
(B) How concerns regarding the accuracy of the information may be resolved.
(C) The steps a business may take to prevent fraud.
(D) If a business rejects a request to correct personal information collected and analyzed concerning a consumer’s health, the right of a consumer to provide a written addendum to the business with respect to any item or statement regarding any such personal information that the consumer believes to be incomplete or incorrect. The addendum shall be limited to 250 words per alleged incomplete or incorrect item and shall clearly indicate in writing that the consumer requests the addendum to be made a part of the consumer’s record.
(8) Establishing the standard to govern a business’s business’ determination, pursuant to subparagraph (B) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.130, that providing information beyond the 12-month period in a response to a verifiable consumer request is impossible or would involve a disproportionate effort.
(9) Issuing regulations further defining and adding to the business purposes, including other notified purposes, for which businesses, service providers, and contractors may use consumers’ personal information consistent with consumers’ expectations, and further defining the business purposes for which service providers and contractors may combine consumers’ personal information obtained from different sources, except as provided for in paragraph (6) of subdivision (e) of Section 1798.140.
(10) Issuing regulations identifying those business purposes, including other notified purposes, for which service providers and contractors may use consumers’ personal information received pursuant to a written contract with a business, for the service provider or contractor’s own business purposes, with the goal of maximizing consumer privacy.
(11) Issuing regulations to further define “intentionally interacts,” with the goal of maximizing consumer privacy.
(12) Issuing regulations to further define “precise geolocation,” including if the size defined is not sufficient to protect consumer privacy in sparsely populated areas or when the personal information is used for normal operational purposes, including billing.
(13) Issuing regulations to define the term “specific pieces of information obtained from the consumer” with the goal of maximizing a consumer’s right to access relevant personal information while minimizing the delivery of information to a consumer that would not be useful to the consumer, including system log information and other technical data. For delivery of the most sensitive personal information, the regulations may require a higher standard of authentication provided that the agency shall monitor the impact of the higher standard on the right of consumers to obtain their personal information to ensure that the requirements of verification do not result in the unreasonable denial of verifiable consumer requests.
(14) Issuing regulations requiring businesses whose processing of consumers’ personal information presents significant risk to consumers’ privacy or security, to:
(A) Perform a cybersecurity audit on an annual basis, including defining the scope of the audit and establishing a process to ensure that audits are thorough and independent. The factors to be considered in determining when processing may result in significant risk to the security of personal information shall include the size and complexity of the business and the nature and scope of processing activities.
(B) Submit to the California Privacy Protection Agency on a regular basis a risk assessment with respect to their processing of personal information, including whether the processing involves sensitive personal information, and identifying and weighing the benefits resulting from the processing to the business, the consumer, other stakeholders, and the public, against the potential risks to the rights of the consumer associated with that processing, with the goal of restricting or prohibiting the processing if the risks to privacy of the consumer outweigh the benefits resulting from processing to the consumer, the business, other stakeholders, and the public. Nothing in this section shall require a business to divulge trade secrets.
(15) Issuing regulations governing access and opt-out rights with respect to businesses’ a business’ use of automated decisionmaking technology, including profiling and requiring businesses’ a business’ response to access requests to include meaningful information about the logic involved in those decisionmaking processes, as well as a description of the likely outcome of the process with respect to the consumer.
(16) Issuing regulations to further define a “law enforcement agency-approved investigation” for purposes of the exception in subparagraph (B) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.145.
(17) Issuing regulations to define the scope and process for the exercise of the agency’s audit authority, to establish criteria for selection of persons to audit, and to protect consumers’ personal information from disclosure to an auditor in the absence of a court order, warrant, or subpoena.
(18) (A) Issuing regulations to define the requirements and technical specifications for an opt-out preference signal sent by a platform, technology, or mechanism, to indicate a consumer’s intent to opt out of the sale or sharing of the consumer’s personal information and to limit the use or disclosure of the consumer’s sensitive personal information. The requirements and specifications for the opt-out preference signal should be updated from time to time to reflect the means by which consumers interact with businesses, and should:
(i) Ensure that the manufacturer of a platform or browser or device that sends the opt-out preference signal cannot unfairly disadvantage another business.
(ii) Ensure that the opt-out preference signal is consumer-friendly, clearly described, and easy to use by an average consumer and does not require that the consumer provide additional information beyond what is necessary.
(iii) Clearly represent a consumer’s intent and be free of defaults constraining or presupposing that intent.
(iv) Ensure that the opt-out preference signal does not conflict with other commonly used privacy settings or tools that consumers may employ.
(v) Provide a mechanism for the consumer to selectively consent to a business’s business’ sale of the consumer’s personal information, or the use or disclosure of the consumer’s sensitive personal information, without affecting the consumer’s preferences with respect to other businesses or disabling the opt-out preference signal globally.
(vi) State that in the case of a page or setting view that the consumer accesses to set the opt-out preference signal, the consumer should see up to three choices, including:
(I) Global opt out from sale and sharing of personal information, including a direction to limit the use of sensitive personal information.
(II) Choice to “Limit the Use of My Sensitive Personal Information.”
(III) Choice titled “Do Not Sell/Do Not Share My Personal Information for Cross-Context Behavioral Advertising.”
(B) Issuing regulations to establish technical specifications for an opt-out preference signal that allows the consumer, or the consumer’s parent or guardian, to specify that the consumer is less than 13 years of age or at least 13 years of age and less than 16 years of age.
(C) Issuing regulations, with the goal of strengthening consumer privacy while considering the legitimate operational interests of businesses, to govern the use or disclosure of a consumer’s sensitive personal information, notwithstanding the consumer’s direction to limit the use or disclosure of the consumer’s sensitive personal information, including:
(i) Determining any additional purposes for which a business may use or disclose a consumer’s sensitive personal information.
(ii) Determining the scope of activities permitted under paragraph (8) of subdivision (e) of Section 1798.140, as authorized by subdivision (a) of Section 1798.121, to ensure that the activities do not involve health-related research.
(iii) Ensuring the functionality of the business’s business’ operations.
(iv) Ensuring that the exemption in subdivision (d) of Section 1798.121 for sensitive personal information applies to information that is collected or processed incidentally, or without the purpose of inferring characteristics about a consumer, while ensuring that businesses do not use the exemption for the purpose of evading consumers’ rights to limit the use and disclosure of their sensitive personal information under Section 1798.121.
(19) Issuing regulations to govern how a business that has elected to comply with subdivision (b) of Section 1798.135 responds to the opt-out preference signal and provides consumers with the opportunity subsequently to consent to the sale or sharing of their personal information or the use and disclosure of their sensitive personal information for purposes in addition to those authorized by subdivision (a) of Section 1798.121. The regulations should:
(A) Strive to promote competition and consumer choice and be technology neutral.
(B) Ensure that the business does not respond to an opt-out preference signal by:
(i) Intentionally degrading the functionality of the consumer experience.
(ii) Charging the consumer a fee in response to the consumer’s opt-out preferences.
(iii) Making any products or services not function properly or fully for the consumer, as compared to consumers who do not use the opt-out preference signal.
(iv) Attempting to coerce the consumer to opt in to the sale or sharing of the consumer’s personal information, or the use or disclosure of the consumer’s sensitive personal information, by stating or implying that the use of the opt-out preference signal will adversely affect the consumer as compared to consumers who do not use the opt-out preference signal, including stating or implying that the consumer will not be able to use the business’s business’ products or services or that those products or services may not function properly or fully.
(v) Displaying any notification or pop-up in response to the consumer’s opt-out preference signal.
(C) Ensure that any link to a web page or its supporting content that allows the consumer to consent to opt in:
(i) Is not part of a popup, notice, banner, or other intrusive design that obscures any part of the web page the consumer intended to visit from full view or that interferes with or impedes in any way the consumer’s experience visiting or browsing the web page or internet website the consumer intended to visit.
(ii) Does not require or imply that the consumer must click the link to receive full functionality of any products or services, including the internet website.
(iii) Does not make use of any dark patterns.
(iv) Applies only to the business with which the consumer intends to interact.
(D) Strive to curb coercive or deceptive practices in response to an opt-out preference signal but should not unduly restrict businesses that are trying in good faith to comply with Section 1798.135.
(20) Review existing Insurance Code provisions and regulations relating to consumer privacy, except those relating to insurance rates or pricing, to determine whether any provisions of the Insurance Code provide greater protection to consumers than the provisions of this title. Upon completing its review, the agency shall adopt a regulation that applies only the more protective provisions of this title to insurance companies. For the purpose of clarity, the Insurance Commissioner shall have jurisdiction over insurance rates and pricing.
(21) Harmonizing the regulations governing opt-out mechanisms, notices to consumers, and other operational mechanisms in this title to promote clarity and the functionality of this title for consumers.
(b) The Attorney General may adopt additional regulations as necessary to further the purposes of this title.
(c) The Attorney General shall not bring an enforcement action under this title until six months after the publication of the final regulations issued pursuant to this section or July 1, 2020, whichever is sooner.
(d) Notwithstanding subdivision (a), the timeline for adopting final regulations required by the act adding this subdivision shall be July 1, 2022. Beginning the later of July 1, 2021, or six months after the agency provides notice to the Attorney General that it is prepared to begin rulemaking under this title, the authority assigned to the Attorney General to adopt regulations under this section shall be exercised by the California Privacy Protection Agency. Notwithstanding any other law, civil and administrative enforcement of the provisions of law added or amended by this act shall not commence until July 1, 2023, and shall only apply to violations occurring on or after that date. Enforcement of provisions of law contained in the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 amended by this act shall remain in effect and shall be enforceable until the same provisions of this act become enforceable.

SEC. 10.

 Section 1798.199.25 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.199.25.
 For each day on which they engage in official duties, members of the agency board shall be compensated at the rate of one hundred dollars ($100), adjusted pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 1798.199.95, and shall be reimbursed for expenses incurred in performance of their official duties.

SEC. 11.

 Section 1798.199.40 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.199.40.
 The agency shall perform the following functions:
(a) Administer, implement, and enforce through administrative actions this title.
(b) On and after the later of July 1, 2021, or within six months of the agency providing the Attorney General with notice that it is prepared to assume rulemaking responsibilities under this title, adopt, amend, and rescind regulations pursuant to Section 1798.185 to carry out the purposes and provisions of the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018, including regulations specifying recordkeeping requirements for businesses to ensure compliance with this title.
(c) Through the implementation of this title, protect the fundamental privacy rights of natural persons with respect to the use of their personal information.
(d) Promote public awareness and understanding of the risks, rules, responsibilities, safeguards, and rights in relation to the collection, use, sale, and disclosure of personal information, including the rights of minors with respect to their own information, and provide a public report summarizing the risk assessments filed with the agency pursuant to paragraph (14) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185 while ensuring that data security is not compromised.
(e) Provide guidance to consumers regarding their rights under this title.
(f) Provide guidance to businesses regarding their duties and responsibilities under this title and appoint a Chief Privacy Auditor to conduct audits of businesses to ensure compliance with this title pursuant to regulations adopted pursuant to paragraph (17) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.185.
(g) Provide technical assistance and advice to the Legislature, upon request, with respect to privacy-related legislation.
(h) Monitor relevant developments relating to the protection of personal information and, in particular, the development of information and communication technologies and commercial practices.
(i) Cooperate with other agencies with jurisdiction over privacy laws and with data processing authorities in California, other states, territories, and countries to ensure consistent application of privacy protections.
(j) Establish a mechanism pursuant to which persons doing business in California that do not meet the definition of business set forth in paragraph (1), (2), or (3) of subdivision (d) of Section 1798.140 may voluntarily certify that they are in compliance with this title, as set forth in paragraph (4) of subdivision (d) of Section 1798.140, and make a list of those entities available to the public.
(k) Solicit, review, and approve applications for grants to the extent funds are available pursuant to paragraph (2) of subdivision (b) of Section 1798.160.
(l) Perform all other acts necessary or appropriate in the exercise of its power, authority, and jurisdiction and seek to balance the goals of strengthening consumer privacy while giving attention to the impact on businesses.

SEC. 12.

 Section 1798.199.45 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.199.45.
 (a) Upon the sworn complaint of any person or on its own initiative, the agency may investigate possible violations of this title relating to any business, service provider, contractor, or person. The agency may decide not to investigate a complaint or decide to provide a business with a time period to cure the alleged violation. In making a decision not to investigate or provide more time to cure, the agency may consider the following:
(1) Lack of intent to violate this title.
(2) Voluntary efforts undertaken by the business, service provider, contractor, or person to cure the alleged violation prior to being notified by the agency of the complaint.
(b) (1) The agency shall notify in writing the person who made the complaint of the action, if any, the agency has taken or plans to take on the complaint, together with the reasons for that action or nonaction.
(2) The written notification required by this subdivision shall not include information that is subject to law enforcement exemptions and privileges, including, but not limited to, confidential information related to an investigation and information that is privileged under the Evidence Code and the Government Code.

SEC. 13.

 Section 1798.199.90 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.199.90.
 (a) Any business, service provider, contractor, or other person that violates this title shall be subject to an injunction and liable for a civil penalty of not more than two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500) for each violation or seven thousand five hundred dollars ($7,500) for each intentional violation and each violation involving the personal information of minor consumers, as adjusted pursuant to subdivision (d) of Section 1798.199.95, which shall be assessed and recovered in a civil action brought in the name of the people of the State of California by the Attorney General. The court may consider the good faith cooperation of the business, service provider, contractor, or other person in determining the amount of the civil penalty.
(b) Any civil penalty recovered by an action brought by the Attorney General for a violation of this title, and the proceeds of any settlement of any said action, shall be deposited in the Consumer Privacy Fund.
(c) The agency shall, upon request by the Attorney General, stay an administrative action or investigation under this title to permit the Attorney General to proceed with an investigation or civil action and shall not pursue an administrative action or investigation, unless the Attorney General subsequently determines not to pursue an investigation or civil action. The agency may not limit the authority of the Attorney General to enforce this title.
(d) No civil action may be filed by the Attorney General under this section for any violation of this title after the agency has issued a decision pursuant to Section 1798.199.85 or an order pursuant to Section 1798.199.55 against that person for the same violation.
(e) This section shall not affect the private right of action provided for in Section 1798.150.

SEC. 14.

 Section 1798.199.95 of the Civil Code is amended to read:

1798.199.95.
 (a) There is hereby appropriated from the General Fund of the state to the agency the sum of five million dollars ($5,000,000) during the fiscal year 2020–21, and the sum of ten million dollars ($10,000,000) adjusted for cost-of-living changes, during each fiscal year thereafter, for expenditure to support the operations of the agency pursuant to this title. The expenditure of funds under this appropriation shall be subject to the normal administrative review given to other state appropriations. The Legislature shall appropriate those additional amounts to the commission and other agencies as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of this title.
(b) The Department of Finance, in preparing the state budget and the Budget Act bill submitted to the Legislature, shall include an item for the support of this title that shall indicate all of the following:
(1) The amounts to be appropriated to other agencies to carry out their duties under this title, which amounts shall be in augmentation of the support items of those agencies.
(2) The additional amounts required to be appropriated by the Legislature to the agency to carry out the purposes of this title, as provided for in this section.
(3) In parentheses, for informational purposes, the continuing appropriation during each fiscal year of ten million dollars ($10,000,000), adjusted for cost-of-living changes made pursuant to this section.
(c) The Attorney General shall provide staff support to the agency until the agency has hired its own staff. The Attorney General shall be reimbursed by the agency for these services.
(d) (1) On January 1, 2025, and on January 1 of any odd-numbered year thereafter, the California Privacy Protection Agency shall adjust the monetary thresholds in subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (d) of Section 1798.140, subparagraph (A) of paragraph (1) of subdivision (a) of Section 1798.150, subdivision (a) of Section 1798.155, Section 1798.199.25, and subdivision (a) of Section 1798.199.90 to reflect any increase in the Consumer Price Index.
(2) The agency shall use the Consumer Price Index (CPI) - California, All Items, All Urban Consumers percentage change from the previous two years’ reports, published by the Department of Industrial Relations, Office of the Director–Research. The agency shall apply the percentage change in the CPI for the August-to-August point in time of the prior two years. The increase in the thresholds shall be rounded to the nearest whole dollar.
(3) The agency shall post the adjusted monetary thresholds on its internet website no later than January 15 of the year in which the adjustment becomes effective.
(4) Notwithstanding any other law, rules and regulations adopted to implement adjustments to monetary thresholds and their publication on the agency’s internet website pursuant to this subdivision are not subject to the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code).

SEC. 15.

 The Legislature finds and declares that this act furthers the purposes and intent of the California Privacy Rights Act of 2020.
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