Bill Text: PA HR81 | 2011-2012 | Regular Session | Introduced


Bill Title: Recognizing the month of March 2011 as "National Women's History Month" in Pennsylvania.

Spectrum: Bipartisan Bill

Status: (Passed) 2011-03-01 - Adopted (198-0) [HR81 Detail]

Download: Pennsylvania-2011-HR81-Introduced.html

  

 

    

PRINTER'S NO.  745

  

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF PENNSYLVANIA

  

HOUSE RESOLUTION

 

No.

81

Session of

2011

  

  

INTRODUCED BY MANN, BISHOP, BOBACK, BOYD, B. BOYLE, K. BOYLE, BRADFORD, BRENNAN, BRIGGS, BROOKS, V. BROWN, BROWNLEE, BUXTON, CALTAGIRONE, COHEN, CONKLIN, D. COSTA, DALEY, DAVIS, DAY, DELOZIER, DeLUCA, DENLINGER, DiGIROLAMO, EVERETT, FABRIZIO, FLECK, GEIST, GEORGE, GILLESPIE, GINGRICH, GOODMAN, GRELL, HAHN, HARHAI, HARHART, HARPER, HENNESSEY, HICKERNELL, HORNAMAN, JOSEPHS, KAVULICH, KILLION, KIRKLAND, KORTZ, KOTIK, KULA, LONGIETTI, MAHONEY, MAJOR, MATZIE, MICOZZIE, MILLARD, MIRABITO, MOUL, MUNDY, MURT, MUSTIO, MYERS, OBERLANDER, M. O'BRIEN, O'NEILL, PASHINSKI, PAYNE, PAYTON, PETRI, PICKETT, PYLE, QUIGLEY, QUINN, RAPP, RAVENSTAHL, READSHAW, REICHLEY, ROEBUCK, ROSS, SAINATO, SANTARSIERO, SANTONI, SCAVELLO, SONNEY, STABACK, SWANGER, THOMAS, TOEPEL, VEREB, VULAKOVICH, WAGNER, WATSON, WHITE, YOUNGBLOOD AND HESS, FEBRUARY 17, 2011

  

  

INTRODUCED AS NONCONTROVERSIAL RESOLUTION UNDER RULE 35, FEBRUARY 17, 2011  

  

  

  

A RESOLUTION

  

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Recognizing the month of March 2011 as "National Women's History

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Month" in Pennsylvania.

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WHEREAS, From the August 18, 1587, birth of Virginia Dare,

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the first child born to English parents in the Americas, through

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the first decade of the 21st century, Pennsylvania women and

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women nationwide have made and continue to make historic

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contributions to the strength and greatness of our nation and

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this Commonwealth in many recorded and unrecorded ways,

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including the struggle for enfranchisement and women's rights;

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and

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WHEREAS, In a March 31, 1776, letter, Abigail Adams, the wife

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of the second President of the United States and mother of the

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sixth, wrote to her husband, "I long to hear that you have

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declared an Independency -- and by the way in the new Code of

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Laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make, I

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desire you would remember the Ladies, and be more generous and

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favorable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited

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power into the hands of the Husbands.... If perticular care and

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attention is not paid to the Ladies we are determined to foment

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a Rebelion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in

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which we have no voice, or Representation"; and

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WHEREAS, In her letters and writings, Abigail Adams planted

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the ideas that made both women and men of her time start to

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think about the rights of women in a country founded on the

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ideals of life, liberty and equality; and

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WHEREAS, Generations later, Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady

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Stanton and Pennsylvanian Lucretia Mott embodied the first

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generation of women's rights activists by working to secure

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women's enfranchisement; and

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WHEREAS, Pennsylvania played a prominent role in the suffrage

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movement with Philadelphia being a hotbed of feminist agitation;

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and

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WHEREAS, In 1868, Susan B. Anthony read her "Declaration of

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Rights of the Women of the United States," modeled after the

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Declaration of Independence, in front of Philadelphia's

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Independence Hall; and

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WHEREAS, It was the lesser-known suffragists, such as

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Pennsylvanians Dora Kelly Lewis and Caroline Katzenstein, who

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inherited the struggle from Anthony, Stanton and Mott and

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oversaw the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment to the

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Constitution of the United States, which gave women the right to

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vote on August 18, 1920; and

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WHEREAS, Other lesser-known Pennsylvania women who were

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active in the suffrage movement included Ann Davies, Florence

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Kelley, Ann Preston and Emma Guffey Miller; and

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WHEREAS, Pennsylvania women and women nationwide paved the

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way by suffering violence and threats of violence, jail and

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public ridicule during their struggles to eliminate gender,

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racial, social and cultural barriers to economic and political

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participation; and

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WHEREAS, From civil rights activists Ida Wells-Barnett, Mary

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McLeod Bethune, Eleanor Roosevelt and Rosa Parks to lesser-known

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Elizabeth Jennings Brown who, not unlike Rosa Parks, became

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frustrated with her inability to freely use privately owned

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public transportation in New York City, women have long

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struggled to secure equal and fair treatment for all; and

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WHEREAS, The commitment of women to gender and racial

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equality has resulted in the ascension of women in politics and

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government; and

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WHEREAS, Martha G. Speiser, Alice M. Bentley, Helen Grimes

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and Sarah M. Gallaher were among a group of eight women first

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elected to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives in 1923;

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and

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WHEREAS, Crystal Bird Fauset, who helped establish the

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Swarthmore College Institute of Race Relations, became the first

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African-American woman to be elected to the Pennsylvania House

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of Representatives, at the time representing Philadelphia's 13th

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Legislative District; and

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WHEREAS, In 1916, Jeanette Rankin of Montana became the first

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woman to be elected to the United States House of

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Representatives; in 1965, Patsy Takemoto Mink of Hawaii became

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the first Asian-American woman so elected; and in 1969, Shirley

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Chisholm became the first African-American woman elected to the

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United States House of Representatives; and

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WHEREAS, Shirley Chisholm was an outspoken advocate for women

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and people of color during her seven terms in Congress; and

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WHEREAS, In 1959, Juanita Kidd Stout became the first

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African-American woman in the nation to win election to a court

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of record when she won election to the Philadelphia Municipal

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Court; and

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WHEREAS, Juanita Kidd Stout made history a second time in

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1988 when her appointment to the Pennsylvania Supreme Court made

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her the first African-American woman to serve on a state supreme

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court; and

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WHEREAS, In 1964, Margaret Chase Smith of Maine became the

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first woman nominated for President of the United States by a

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major political party, and, in 1984, Geraldine Ferraro was

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selected to run for Vice President, followed by Sarah Palin in

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2008; and

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WHEREAS, In 1990, Dr. Antonia Novello was sworn in as United

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States Surgeon General, becoming the first woman and the first

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Latina appointed to that position; and

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WHEREAS, From the Honorable Sandra Day O'Connor, who became

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the first woman to serve as an Associate Justice of the United

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States Supreme Court in 1981, to the Honorable Ruth Bader

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Ginsburg, who was appointed as an Associate Justice to that

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court in 1993, to the Honorable Sonia Sotomayor, who rose from

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the public housing projects of the Bronx to nomination and

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confirmation as the first Puerto Rican-American to serve as an

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Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court in 2009,

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and to Sandra Schultz Newman and Debra Todd who were the first

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and second women elected to Pennsylvania's highest court,

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respectively, women have broken the glass ceiling in all

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branches of government; and

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WHEREAS, Currently, 72 women hold statewide executive offices

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nationwide; and

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WHEREAS, Women hold a record number 1,718 seats in state

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legislatures nationwide; and

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WHEREAS, In 2009, the New Hampshire State Senate was the

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first state legislative chamber to have a female majority with

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thirteen women and eleven men; and

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WHEREAS, With her election as State Treasurer in 1988,

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Katherine Baker Knoll became the first woman in this

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Commonwealth to be elected to a Statewide row office and the

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first woman to serve as Lieutenant Governor when she was sworn

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in as Pennsylvania's 30th Lieutenant Governor in 2003; and

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WHEREAS, From Madeleine Korbel Albright, the first female

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Secretary of State, to Condoleezza Rice, the first African-

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American woman to serve as Secretary of State, and to Hillary

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Rodham Clinton, the first First Lady to win a United States

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Senate seat, to run for the United States presidency and to

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later serve as Secretary of State, American women continue to

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reach for pinnacles of elected and political office nationally

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and internationally; and

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WHEREAS, In 1987, the United States Congress, encouraged by

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petition of the National Women's History Project, adopted the

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first resolution to recognize the entire month of March as

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"Women's History Month" in order to commemorate the

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accomplishments and contributions of women; and

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WHEREAS, In 1998, President William J. Clinton signed the

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"Women's Progress Commemoration Act" into law on the 150th

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anniversary of the Seneca Falls Convention, the first national

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congregation on the condition of women in the United States, for

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the purpose of commemorating, celebrating and preserving women's

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history; and

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WHEREAS, American women, including many Pennsylvania women,

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have been leaders, not only in securing their own rights of

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suffrage, but also in the abolitionist movement, the

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emancipation movement, the suffrage movement, the labor movement

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and the civil and equal rights movements; and

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WHEREAS, 2011 marks the 31st anniversary of the National

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Women's History Project; and 

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WHEREAS, The National Women's History Project began with a

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proclamation by President Jimmy Carter that declared the week of

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March 8, 1980, as the first National Women's History Week; and

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WHEREAS, The recognition of March as "Women's History Month"

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has highlighted the numerous contributions of women to the

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progression of American society and their position at the

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forefront of movements that created a more fair and just society

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for all people; therefore be it

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RESOLVED, That the House of Representatives recognize March

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2011 as "National Women's History Month" in Pennsylvania and

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invite the women, men and children of this Commonwealth to

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continue to explore the many roles women played and continue to

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play to secure a just and fair democracy, to explore the

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contributions of women to the greatness of this Commonwealth and

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the nation and to celebrate "National Women's History Month

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2011" with the theme of "Our History is Our Strength."

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