Bill Text: CA AB23 | 2019-2020 | Regular Session | Introduced


Bill Title: Workforce training programs.

Spectrum: Partisan Bill (Democrat 1-0)

Status: (Introduced) 2018-12-04 - From printer. May be heard in committee January 3. [AB23 Detail]

Download: California-2019-AB23-Introduced.html


CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE— 2019–2020 REGULAR SESSION

Assembly Bill No. 23


Introduced by Assembly Member Burke

December 03, 2018


An act relating to workforce development.


LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


AB 23, as introduced, Burke. Workforce training programs.
The California Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act establishes the California Workforce Development Board as the body responsible for assisting the Governor in the development, oversight, and continuous improvement of California’s workforce investment system and the alignment of the education and workforce investment systems to the needs of the 21st century economy and workforce.
This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation to incentivize systems that better facilitate communication and partnerships between businesses, labor advocates, and educational institutions for the purpose of creating tailored workforce training programs that both increase worker participation and further the attainment of increased skills. The bill would make related legislative findings and declarations.
Vote: MAJORITY   Appropriation: NO   Fiscal Committee: NO   Local Program: NO  

The people of the State of California do enact as follows:


SECTION 1.

 (a) The Legislature finds and declares the following:
(1) California’s labor market is increasingly reliant upon a better-trained workforce.
(2) California has a projected shortfall of one to one and one-half million workers with some postsecondary education, but not a bachelor’s degree.
(3) If California is unable to adequately address workforce needs, this state risks foregoing economic opportunities and reducing our market competitiveness, thus limiting or altering our state’s economic growth.
(4) Wages increase on average from 20 to 30 percent when comparing California workers who have had some postsecondary education to those with only a high school diploma.
(5) It is critical for California to not only address the widening gap between the trained labor supply and the demand for high-growth professions but to also incentivize further training in low-growth occupations to facilitate upward economic mobility for Californians working in those occupations.
(b) It is the intent of the Legislature to enact legislation to incentivize systems that better facilitate communication and partnerships between businesses, labor advocates, and educational institutions for the purpose of creating tailored workforce training programs that both increase worker participation and further the attainment of increased skills.
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