Bill Text: CA SB260 | 2013-2014 | Regular Session | Introduced

NOTE: There are more recent revisions of this legislation. Read Latest Draft
Bill Title: Youth offender parole hearings.

Status: (Passed) 2013-09-16 - Chaptered by Secretary of State. Chapter 312, Statutes of 2013. [SB260 Detail]

Download: California-2013-SB260-Introduced.html
BILL NUMBER: SB 260	INTRODUCED
	BILL TEXT


INTRODUCED BY   Senator Hancock

                        FEBRUARY 13, 2013

   An act relating to sentencing.


	LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


   SB 260, as introduced, Hancock. Sentencing.
   Existing law provides that, subject to specified exceptions, a
defendant who was under 18 years old at the time he or she committed
his or her offense for which the defendant was sentenced to
imprisonment for life without the possibility of parole and who has
served at least 15 years of his or her sentence may petition the
court to recall and resentence him or her, provided that he or she
satisfies certain criteria and follows applicable procedural
requirements. If the court finds by a preponderance of the evidence
that the statements in the defendant's petition are true, existing
law requires the court to hold a hearing to determine whether to
recall and resentence the defendant, and, after considering certain
factors, the court may recall and resentence the defendant, as
specified.
   This bill would state the intent of the Legislature to enact
legislation creating an alternate judicial mechanism for
reconsidering the sentences of individuals, who were convicted of
crimes that they committed as children, after they have become adults
and served a significant amount of time in state prison.
   Vote: majority. Appropriation: no. Fiscal committee: no.
State-mandated local program: no.


THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

  SECTION 1.  It is the intent of the Legislature to enact
legislation to create an alternate judicial mechanism for
reconsidering the sentences of individuals, who were convicted of
crimes that they committed as children, after they have become adults
and served a significant amount of time in state prison.       
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