Bill Text: NJ AR209 | 2018-2019 | Regular Session | Introduced


Bill Title: Urges American Academy of Pediatrics to require pediatricians discuss with parents the dangers of drowning.

Spectrum: Partisan Bill (Republican 1-0)

Status: (Introduced) 2019-01-15 - Introduced, Referred to Assembly Health and Senior Services Committee [AR209 Detail]

Download: New_Jersey-2018-AR209-Introduced.html

ASSEMBLY RESOLUTION No. 209

STATE OF NEW JERSEY

218th LEGISLATURE

 

INTRODUCED JANUARY 15, 2019

 


 

Sponsored by:

Assemblyman  SEAN T. KEAN

District 30 (Monmouth and Ocean)

 

 

 

 

SYNOPSIS

     Urges American Academy of Pediatrics to require pediatricians discuss with parents the dangers of drowning.

 

CURRENT VERSION OF TEXT

     As introduced.

  


An Assembly Resolution urging the American Academy of Pediatrics to require pediatricians to discuss with parents the dangers of drowning.

 

Whereas, The USA Swimming Foundation reports nearly 90 children younger than 15 drowned in a pool or spa from January through May 2018, and every year about 19 children drown during the July 4 holiday; and

Whereas, Recently released research from the USA Swimming Foundation also shows 64 percent of African-American children, 45 percent of Hispanic children, and 40 percent of Caucasian children have little to no swimming ability; and

Whereas, Every year, 350 children under the age of five drown in pools nationwide; and

Whereas, While drowning deaths peak among one and two year olds, drownings continue to be the second leading cause of preventable death through age 15; and

Whereas, The United States Consumer Products Safety Commission reports that 74 percent of drowning incidents for children younger than 15 between 2015 and 2017 occurred in residential locations, and that boys younger than 15 die from drowning at twice the rate as girls; and

Whereas, According to research conducted by the National Safety Council, 780 people ages five to 24 drowned in 2016; of those, 530 were between the ages of 15 and 24; and

Whereas, Emergency departments treat about 6,400 pool and spa injuries in children younger than 15 every year.  Some of these injuries result in permanent brain damage; and

Whereas, Medical costs for drowning victims can be expensive.  Costs range from $2,000 for a victim that recovers fully to $150,000 for a victim with severe brain damage; and

Whereas, Drowning accidents involving children usually happen in familiar surroundings.  Sixty-five percent of the accidents happened in a pool owned by the child's family, and one-third of the drownings happened in pools owned by relatives or friends; and

Whereas, At the time of most drowning accidents, the victims were being supervised by one or both parents, and

Whereas, The survival of a child involved in a drowning accident depends on rescuing a child quickly and restarting the breathing process as soon as possible, even when the child is still in the water; and

Whereas, In order to avoid drowning accidents involving children, an adult should actively watch children at all times while they are in a pool, and the supervising adult should know how to swim; and

Whereas, For infants and toddlers, an adult should be in the water and within arm's reach, providing "touch supervision."  For older children, an adult should be paying constant attention and free from distractions, like talking on the phone, socializing, tending household chores, or drinking alcohol; and

Whereas, The American Academy of Pediatrics should require all pediatricians to discuss with parents the dangers of drowning and the importance of acting quickly when children are found submerged in a pool in order to prevent serious injury or death; now, therefore,

 

     Be It Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:

 

     1.    This House urges the American Academy of Pediatrics to require all pediatricians to discuss with parents the dangers of drowning and the importance of acting quickly when children are found submerged in a pool in order to prevent serious injury or death.

 

     2.    Copies of this resolution, as filed with the Secretary of State, shall be transmitted by the Clerk of the Assembly to the American Academy of Pediatrics.

 

 

STATEMENT

 

     This resolution urges the American Academy of Pediatrics to require all pediatricians to discuss with parents the dangers of drowning and the importance of acting quickly when children are found submerged in a pool in order to prevent serious injury or death.

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