Bill Text: NJ AJR149 | 2018-2019 | Regular Session | Introduced


Bill Title: Designates September of each year as "Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month" in New Jersey.

Spectrum: Bipartisan Bill

Status: (Engrossed) 2018-09-27 - Received in the Senate without Reference, 2nd Reading [AJR149 Detail]

Download: New_Jersey-2018-AJR149-Introduced.html

ASSEMBLY JOINT RESOLUTION

No. 149

STATE OF NEW JERSEY

218th LEGISLATURE

 

INTRODUCED SEPTEMBER 13, 2018

 


 

Sponsored by:

Assemblywoman  HOLLY T. SCHEPISI

District 39 (Bergen and Passaic)

Assemblywoman  MILA M. JASEY

District 27 (Essex and Morris)

Assemblyman  GORDON M. JOHNSON

District 37 (Bergen)

 

Co-Sponsored by:

Assemblywoman Gove, Assemblymen Rumpf, Peterson, Harold J. Wirths, Space, A.M.Bucco, Howarth, Assemblywoman DiMaso, Assemblyman Thomson, Assemblywoman Handlin, Assemblymen McGuckin, Caputo, Mazzeo, Assemblywoman Downey, Assemblyman Houghtaling, Assemblywoman Swain, Assemblymen Coughlin, Rooney, DePhillips, Assemblywoman N.Munoz, Assemblymen Bramnick, DeAngelo, Egan, Assemblywomen Chaparro, Jones, Mosquera, Assemblyman Conaway, Assemblywoman Tucker, Assemblymen Holley, Wimberly, Assemblywoman Pintor Marin, Assemblymen Auth and S.Kean

 

 

 

 

SYNOPSIS

     Designates September of each year as "Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month" in New Jersey.

 

CURRENT VERSION OF TEXT

     As introduced.

  


A Joint Resolution designating September of each year as "Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month" in New Jersey.

 

Whereas, A brain aneurysm is a bulging, weakened area in the wall of an artery in the brain, resulting in an abnormal widening or ballooning; and

Whereas, Over six million Americans, or roughly one in 50 people, have unruptured brain aneurysms, meaning they have aneurysms that have not leaked blood or burst open; and

Whereas, Although unruptured brain aneurysms typically do not manifest symptoms, an unruptured aneurysm may become large enough to produce pressure on the brain tissue or adjacent nerves, potentially resulting in difficulty with vision, numbness or weakness of an arm or leg, difficulty with memory or speech, or seizures; and

Whereas, A brain aneurysm ruptures when it leaks or busts open, causing blood to be released into the subarachnoid space between the brain and the skull; and

Whereas, Symptoms for ruptured brain aneurysms include sudden and severe headache, often described as the "worst headache of someone's life"; sudden sensitivity to light; neck stiffness; sharp pain behind or above one eye; blurred or double vision; numbness and tightening in the face; sudden loss of consciousness; confusion or change of mental status; seizure; perceived "gunshot" noise or extremely loud "boom"; drooping eyelid; and nausea and vomiting; and

Whereas, In the event of the sudden, "worst headache of life", it is imperative that a person go to the hospital immediately; and

Whereas, Each year, more than 40,000 people in the United States suffer from ruptured brain aneurysms and 50 percent of these people die within days. Of the 50 percent who survive, one-third will die within months as a result of complications, one-third will suffer from major neurological deficits, and one-third will be able to return to a way of life similar to that prior to the rupture; and

Whereas, Knowing risk factors and methods of early detection and treatment can save lives as aneurysms can often be treated; and

Whereas, Risk factors for developing brain aneurysms include cigarette or drug use, concussions, disorders of the body's structural proteins, fibromuscular dysplasia, chronic hypertension, family history of brain aneurysms, and polycystic kidney disease; and

Whereas, Through imaging screening tests such as the computerized tomography (CT) scan, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) test, and the cerebral arteriogram, individuals at high risk of a brain aneurysm can be identified easily; and

Whereas, Treatment options for a brain aneurysm include surgical clipping to close off the aneurysm; endovascular coiling to disrupt blood flow in the aneurysm and seal it off from the artery; and flow diverters to stop blood movement within the aneurysm and stimulate the body to heal the site; now, therefore,

     Be It Resolved by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:

 

     1.    September of each year is designated as "Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month" in New Jersey in order to raise awareness of the signs of and risks associated with brain aneurysms, methods of screening and early detection, ways to prevent brain aneurysms, and treatment options.

 

     2.    The Governor is respectfully requested to annually issue a proclamation recognizing September as "Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month" in New Jersey, and call upon public officials and the citizens of this State to observe the day with appropriate activities and programs.

 

     3.    This joint resolution shall take effect immediately.

 

 

STATEMENT

 

     This joint resolution designates September of each year as "Brain Aneurysm Awareness Month" in New Jersey to bring awareness to the signs of and risks associated with brain aneurysms, methods of screening and early detection, and prevention and treatment options.

     Over six million Americans have unruptured brain aneurysms. Many people may be unaware they have an aneurysm as unruptured brain aneurysms typically do not manifest symptoms. However, large unruptured aneurysms may show certain symptoms.

     Ruptured brain aneurysms annually affect 40,000 people in the United States, with 50 percent of those people dying within days. Of those who survive ruptured brain aneurysms, one-third will die within months, one-third will suffer from major neurological deficits, and one-third will be able to return to a way of life similar to that prior to the rupture. Symptoms for a ruptured brain aneurysm include sudden and severe headache, often described as the "worst headache of someone's life;" sensitivity to light; neck stiffness; sharp pain behind or above one eye; blurred or double vision; numbness and tightening in the face; loss of consciousness; confusion or change of mental status; seizure; perceived "gunshot" noise or extremely loud "boom;" drooping eyelid; and nausea and vomiting. Notably, in the event of the sudden, "worst headache of life," it is imperative that a person go to the hospital immediately.

     Knowing the symptoms, risk factors, early detection methods, and treatment options for brain aneurysms can save lives.

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